Sri Lanka’s Presidential Election Brings Back a Polarising Wartime Figure (Crisis Group)

Gotabaya Rajapaksa’s decisive victory in Sri Lanka’s presidential election reflects voters’ concerns over security, poor economic prospects and ineffective governance – but also indicates the country’s dangerous ethnic polarisation. Many worry that Rajapaksa, a Sinhalese nationalist, will energise anti-Muslim campaigning and further alienate the Tamil community.

https://www.crisisgroup.org/asia/south-asia/sri-lanka/sri-lankas-presidential-election-brings-back-polarising-wartime-figure

Alan Keenan

Women and Children First: Repatriating the Westerners Affiliated with ISIS (Crisis Group)

Tens of thousands of foreign men, women and children affiliated with ISIS are detained in northeast Syria. The camps where they are held pose a formidable security and humanitarian challenge to the region. Western governments should, at minimum, accelerate the repatriation of women and children.

https://www.crisisgroup.org/middle-east-north-africa/eastern-mediterranean/syria/208-women-and-children-first-repatriating-westerners-affiliated-isis

 

Germany’s quiet leadership on the Libyan war (ECFR)

Although Germany’s mediation role in the Libyan conflict has received relatively little attention so far, this might change if its initiative leads to a peace conference – or, alternatively, a collapse of the political process.

https://www.ecfr.eu/article/commentary_germanys_quiet_leadership_on_the_libyan_war

René Wildangel   Tarek Megerisi

Human Rights Priorities: An Agenda for Equality and Social Justice (Chatham House)

Following just over one year in office, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet, outlines her ongoing priorities at a tumultuous time for fundamental rights protections worldwide.

Michelle Bachelet, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
Chair: Ruma Mandal, Head, International Law Programme, Chatham House

Chatham House Prize 2019: Presentation by HM The Queen and Speeches (Chatham House)

Sir David Attenborough and Julian Hector, on behalf of BBC Studios Natural History Unit, collect the prize presented by Her Majesty The Queen during a special members event at Chatham House.

https://www.chathamhouse.org/file/chatham-house-prize-2019-presentation-hm-queen-and-speeches

Speakers

HM The Queen
Sir David Attenborough, Presenter, Blue Planet II 
Mark Brownlow, Series Producer, Blue Planet II 
Dr Julian Hector, Head, BBC Studios Natural History Unit
Moderator: Karen Sack, President and CEO, Ocean Unite
Host: Dr Robin Niblett CMG, Director, Chatham House

Impeachment and the Wider World (Project-Syndicate)

As with the proceedings against former US Presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton, the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump is ultimately a domestic political issue that will be decided in the US Congress. But, unlike those earlier cases, the Ukraine scandal threatens to jam up the entire machinery of US foreign policy.

https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/impeachment-impact-on-us-foreign-policy-by-carl-bildt-2019-11

Carl Bildt was Sweden’s foreign minister from 2006 to 2014 and Prime Minister from 1991 to 1994, when he negotiated Sweden’s EU accession. A renowned international diplomat, he served as EU Special Envoy to the Former Yugoslavia, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, UN Special Envoy to the Balkans, and Co-Chairman of the Dayton Peace Conference. He is Co-Chair of the European Council on Foreign Relations.

Making America Mediocre (Project-Syndicate)

America owes its economic strength to its private sector, which has long benefited from an absence of undue influence by politicians and the state. But under US President Donald Trump’s administration, discretionary decisions by policymakers are increasingly giving some companies advantages over others.

https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/trump-market-intervention-distorting-outcomes-by-anne-krueger-2019-11

Anne O. Krueger, a former World Bank chief economist and former first deputy managing director of the International Monetary Fund, is Senior Research Professor of International Economics at the School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University, and Senior Fellow at the Center for International Development, Stanford University.

What Next for Unconventional Monetary Policies? (Project-Syndicate)

Although interest-rate cuts and central-bank asset purchases were highly effective in resolving the 2008 financial crisis, they have proved utterly disappointing in the years since. At this stage, it should be clear that the sustained weakness of private-sector investment is not a problem central bankers can fix on their own.

https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/unconventional-monetary-policy-no-longer-effective-by-stephen-grenville-2019-11

Stephen Grenville, a former deputy governor of the Reserve Bank of Australia, is a non-resident fellow at the Lowy Institute in Sydney.

Why Financial Markets’ New Exuberance Is Irrational (Project-Syndicate)

Owing to a recent easing of both Sino-American tensions and monetary policies, many investors seem to be betting on another era of expansion for the global economy. But they would do well to remember that the fundamental risks to growth remain, and are actually getting worse.

https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/financial-markets-new-exuberance-is-irrational-by-nouriel-roubini-2019-11

Nouriel Roubini, Professor of Economics at New York University’s Stern School of Business and Chairman of Roubini Macro Associates, was Senior Economist for International Affairs in the White House’s Council of Economic Advisers during the Clinton Administration. He has worked for the International Monetary Fund, the US Federal Reserve, and the World Bank. His website is NourielRoubini.com.