The Kremlin Experiments Going Unnoticed Ahead of Russian Elections (Carnegie Moscow Center)

A TV star-turned-politician is as good a new model as any for candidates for State Duma elections: someone who criticizes everyone, but then on fundamental issues will always willingly support the authorities. The Kremlin is currently studying the potential of this kind of candidate. The global trend of populists winning; actors, singers and other celebrities turning their hand to politics; and the departure of traditional parties are all things Russia has already seen, and not so long ago either. It would not be hard to return to that time.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/79776

Andrey Pertsev

Official Visit Symbolizes New U.S. Attitude to Belarus (Carnegie Moscow Center)

Both Belarusian officials and U.S. presidential adviser John Bolton were quick to put out the message that the visit was more about form than content. Bolton said openly that no issues had been resolved at the meeting, but that he had not expected otherwise. Belarusian Foreign Minister Vladimir Makei said that no one was enticing Minsk over to any side, and that the two sides had simply agreed to keep communicating.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/79765

Artyom Shraibman

Idealism vs. Reality: Ukraine’s New Government Prepares for Challenges (Carnegie Moscow Center)

The new Ukrainian government’s main problem is the harsh reality awaiting it. The majority of the new ministers—progressive young idealists who have studied at Western universities, founders of successful startups—may not be sufficiently familiar with the conditions of everyday life in the country away from the post-industrial digital economy clusters. A collision with that reality could be a shock, both for the reformers themselves and for Ukrainian society, which is desperate for immediate change.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/79761

Konstantin Skorkin

Panic and Secrecy Reign Following Mysterious Explosion in Russia (Carnegie Moscow Center)

In Russia, any information can be classified without discussion, from genuinely secret data about military developments to information that is in the public interest, such as the level of radiation in cities, and the names of those killed or injured as the result of an accident. Official recognition of these deaths, by naming the victims and according them full honors, could have become a source of pride and a good precedent, but the authorities still have not done this following the explosion near Severodvinsk: it’s not even known exactly how many people were injured.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/79747

Alexandra Dzhordzhevich

Has Russia, Inc. Stalwart Chemezov Crossed the Barricades? (Carnegie Moscow Center)

Sergei Chemezov’s comments on the public mood in Russia testify not to the specter of a thaw, but, on the contrary, to the fact that the clampdown is in full swing, and only individual members of the inner circle are apprehensive of the authorities’ new radical strategy of repression, which will provoke a new spiral in the war that is already de facto raging between the state and civil society.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/79714

Andrei Kolesnikov

Ukraine’s New President: Servant of the People, or Father of the Nation? (Carnegie Moscow Center)

Under President Zelensky, the decisionmaking center is being dislodged to make way for the president himself and the circle of people close to him. The role of the government will be reduced to that of technical implementation, while the new parliament, with its single-party majority and weak opposition, will also lose a lot of its former influence. This style of ruling is more akin to a super-presidential republic than the parliamentary-presidential model customary for Ukraine.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/79727

Konstantin Skorkin

A Chinese-Russian Regional Program Ends With a Whimper (Carnegie Moscow Center)

The failure of the Program of Cooperation (2009–2018) cannot be blamed entirely on the inertia of Russian bureaucrats or the paucity of local budgets. The program was underdeveloped from the start.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/77341

Ivan Zuenko

Resolving Ukraine’s Orthodox Church Crisis (Carnegie Moscow Center)

Ukraine already has the autonomous Moscow Patriarchate Church. Soon, the country might also have an autonomous Constantinople Patriarchate Church. The Moscow patriarch has threatened to sever ties with Constantinople if the Ukrainian Orthodox Church becomes autocephalous, or fully independent from another country’s patriarch. This probably won’t happen if the church only becomes autonomous, stopping one step short of autocephaly.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/77329

Alexander  Zanemonets