Are Russians Ready for Lasting Change? (Carnegie Moscow Center)

The Russian public’s appetite for change has increased considerably in the past two years, according to a new poll by the Carnegie Moscow Center and the Levada Center. What kind of change do people want, and what are they prepared to do about it?

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/80977

Andrei Kolesnikov

Denis Volkov

Why Aren’t Russians Protesting Putin’s Reforms? (Carnegie Moscow Center)

Most Russians are dumbfounded and intrigued, but not necessarily angry at Putin’s strategy of commencing constitutional change before anyone expected it. This may only change if people’s current expectations are confounded, and Putin doesn’t step down as president after all.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/80931

Alexander Baunov

Oil Spoils the Russia-Belarus Romance (Carnegie Moscow Center)

Belarus’s resolution to become less dependent on Russian oil has nothing to do with its economy. Minsk is making a political statement with the aim of depriving Moscow of one of its main bargaining chips in their relationship.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/80905

Artyom Shraibman

Russia Prepares for New Tandemocracy (Carnegie Moscow Center)

Putin’s proposed amendments to various roles amount to something resembling an insurance policy, which suggests that the president has already decided who his successor will be, though he may not name that person for another three years.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/80838

Tatiana Stanovaya

Did Putin Just Appoint Himself President for Life? (Carnegie Moscow Center)

President Putin’s unexpected proposals this week to change the Russian constitution prompted the instant resignation of the Russian government. What’s he trying to achieve, and will he succeed?

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/80826

Dmitri Trenin

Alexander Baunov

Andrei Kolesnikov

Tatiana Stanovaya

Planning for a (Not-So) Post-Putin Russia (Carnegie Moscow Center)

Of the constitutional reforms put forward by Putin, what will really change a lot is the proposal to give the Russian constitution—including repressive Russian legislation—priority over international law. This violation of the usual hierarchy is nothing short of a legal revolution.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/80813

Andrei Kolesnikov

United Russia’s Rehabilitation Means a Tightening of the Screws (Carnegie Moscow Center)

The ruling party will clearly retain its central place under any future scenario for the transition of power, and anyone who hurries to jump on the bandwagon today will likely come out on top.

https://carnegie.ru/commentary/80446

Tatiana Stanovaya