The crisis in arms control: what crisis ? (Clingendael)

Arms control appears to be in a state of crisis. This Clingendael Spectator series explores the different dimensions of this global challenge. This introductory episode provides an oversight of the most important recent developments in arms control. What crisis are we exactly talking about?

https://spectator.clingendael.org/en/publication/crisis-arms-control-what-crisis

Hugo Klijn

(DIS)UNITY ON THE NATO AGENDA (Clingendael)

 

This year marks the 70th anniversary of NATO, which its 29 members will commemorate on 3 and 4 December in London. To be clear: this will not be a regular NATO ‘Summit’. The gathering has a less formal status and will not be concluded with a common statement on how to move forward. Rumour has it that changing the name to a NATO’s ‘Leaders Meeting’ was inspired by President Trump’s capricious behaviour during past summits. This development is indicative of a larger problem: disunity within the Alliance. NATO is the most important security organisation of our time, but is it aware of its most pressing threat?

https://www.clingendael.org/publication/disunity-nato-agenda

SYRIA: FOREIGN INTERVENTIONS AND THE REVENGE OF REALPOLITIK (Clingendael)

Afghanistan, Syria, Libya and Mali have been hotbeds of conflict for years on end. In each of these conflicts, the West is involved, either directly or indirectly by means of NATO or UN missions. In this Clingendael Spectator series on Western interventions, the current status and the future of the conflicts will be analysed. Second stop: Syria, where the Turkish invasion that started on 9 October is only the latest illustration of the fact that the Syrian civil war has featured one foreign intervention after another. This article provides an assessment of the tactical military success and the broader strategic effects of eight sets of intervention.

https://spectator.clingendael.org/en/publication/syria-foreign-interventions-and-revenge-realpolitik

1945, 1979 and 2016: the Brexit reset of British politics (Clingendael)

Modern British politics is usually dated to either 1945 or 1979, both years symbolising generational resets that created new consensuses in British politics. As Tim Oliver explains, 2016 is the new year by which British politics is dated. But instead of a new consensus, post-2016 Britain faces a generation of constraining dissensus.

https://spectator.clingendael.org/en/publication/1945-1979-and-2016-brexit-reset-british-politics

Tim Oliver