The Spring of Latin America’s Discontent (PIIE)

The violent demonstrations in Latin America in the spring of 2019 have prompted many theories about why so many protests have taken place spontaneously and at the same time. Some have asked: Was this a sudden eruption of hopes for a democratic revival? Unfortunately, the answer is a qualified no.

https://www.piie.com/blogs/realtime-economic-issues-watch/spring-latin-americas-discontent?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=%24%7Bfeed%7D&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+%24%7BRealTime%7D+%28%24%7BRealTime%7D%29

Monica de Bolle (PIIE)

Trade Talks 107: Bombed Embassies and Document Leaks – How China Got into the WTO (PIIE)

Paul Blustein (Centre for International Governance Innovation) joins to discuss the contentious process of US-China negotiations in the late 1990s that ultimately resulted in China joining the World Trade Organization. Their discussion of his latest book – Schism: China, America, and the Fracturing of the Global Trading System – sets the stage for much of the subsequent challenges that continue to affect the US-China trade relationship today.

https://www.piie.com/experts/peterson-perspectives/trade-talks-107-bombed-embassies-and-document-leaks-how-china-got-wto

Featuring Soumaya Keynes (The Economist) and Chad P. Bown (PIIE)

US-China Trade War: The Guns of August (PIIE)

August, which is supposed to be a somnolent month, has erupted in 2019 in a blaze of threats and tariff escalations. At times, President Donald Trump’s trade war with China has seemed like it was spinning out of control. A pivotal moment occurred August 23 when China announced details of its long-anticipated retaliation to Trump’s newest tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese imports. Trump’s immediate response was for yet another round of his own tariffs and a bizarre directive to US companies to pull out of China.

https://www.piie.com/blogs/trade-and-investment-policy-watch/us-china-trade-war-guns-august

Chad P. Bown (PIIE)

A Drop in Tourism Is Threatening Hong Kong’s Economy (PIIE)

Racked by antigovernment protests since June 2019, Hong Kong is on the brink of recession. Its economy contracted by 0.4 percent in real terms in the second quarter of 2019 over the preceding quarter. If this trend has continued in the third quarter, Hong Kong might have already fallen into a technical recession,[1] as the territory’s financial secretary has warned. A leading cause of its economic troubles is the well-publicized plunge in the tourism industry

https://www.piie.com/blogs/china-economic-watch/drop-tourism-threatening-hong-kongs-economy

Tianlei Huang (PIIE)