Reacting to food price spikes: Commodity of errors (World Bank blogs)

Agricultural and food prices are expected to rise only moderately in 2019. However, risks of extreme weather, an escalation of trade tensions, or a jump in energy prices could trigger higher prices.

https://blogs.worldbank.org/developmenttalk/reacting-food-price-spikes-commodity-errors

SUBMITTED BY CSILLA LAKATOS

CO-AUTHORS: DAVID LABORDEWILL MARTIN

3 Ways to advance usage and drive impact in financial inclusion (World Bank blogs)

Unprecedented technological advancements and corresponding innovations in business models have helped financial inclusion evolve beyond merely connecting people to a bank account. It is, for instance, helping level the playing field for small farmers by providing access to buyers, more efficient pricing, and speedier payments. It is replacing unwieldy paper voucher systems used amid humanitarian crises with prepaid cards for food and supplies. And it is helping small and micro-merchants expand their businesses by leveraging purchase data to enable credit scoring.

https://blogs.worldbank.org/allaboutfinance/3-ways-advance-usage-and-drive-impact-financial-inclusion

SUBMITTED BY DAN SALAZAR

CO-AUTHORS: CARLOS MONTEVERDE

Preventing conflict through human rights-based early warning in Africa (World Bank blogs)

The nature of conflict is changing. Fighting has taken on new forms, often involving a burgeoning constellation of armed groups operating in increasingly complex threat environments that feature not only state armies, but non-state armed groups, criminal gangs, drug-traffickers, and groups designated as terrorist organizations. These actors employ new communications and weapons technologies, and frequently operate across national borders.

https://blogs.worldbank.org/dev4peace/preventing-conflict-through-human-rights-based-early-warning-africa

SUBMITTED BY DAN OWEN

Tools of the trade: Using iemargins to graph impacts with standard error bars (IE Analytics update) (World Bank blogs)

It’s been nearly 5 years since David McKenzie showed us how to add standard error bars to Stata mean estimation comparing treatment and control groups. A recent reader email wrote to suggest that this how-to was due for an update, so here it is.

https://blogs.worldbank.org/impactevaluations/tools-trade-using-iemargins-graph-impacts-standard-error-bars-ie-analytics-update

SUBMITTED BY BENJAMIN DANIELS

Confronting tobacco illicit trade: a global review of country experiences (World Bank blogs)

Illicit trade in tobacco products undermines global tobacco prevention and control interventions, particularly with respect to tobacco tax policy. From a public health perspective, illicit trade weakens the effect of tobacco excise taxes on tobacco consumption – and consequently on preventable morbidity and mortality – by increasing the affordability, attractiveness, and/or availability of tobacco products. Furthermore, tobacco illicit trade often depends on and can contribute to weakened governance.

https://blogs.worldbank.org/health/confronting-tobacco-illicit-trade-critical-overall-policy-reform-global-review

SUBMITTED BY SHEILA DUTTA

Why we need to integrate gender equality and women’s empowerment in disaster recovery – and how to do it! (World Bank blogs)

Did you know that women, girls, men and boys are often affected differently by disasters? While natural hazards make no distinction as to who they strike, underlying “man-made” vulnerabilities – such as gender inequality caused by socioeconomic conditions, social norms, cultural beliefs and traditional practices – can leave some groups much worse off than others. Disasters harm all, but they often disproportionally affect women and girls because of their lower access to political, economic and social resources as well as social and cultural gender-specific expectations and norms.

https://blogs.worldbank.org/sustainablecities/why-we-need-integrate-gender-equality-and-women-s-empowerment-disaster-recovery-and-how-do-it

SUBMITTED BY CINDY PATRICIA QUIJADA ROBLES

Sustainable Mobility for All: Changing the mindset, changing policies (World Bank blogs)

The global conversation on transport and mobility has evolved significantly over the past five years. Take transport and climate, for instance: although data on the carbon footprint of major transport modes had been available for a long time, it was not until COP21 in 2015 that mobility became a central part of the climate agenda. The good news is that, during that same period, the space of solutions expanded as well.  For example, data sharing is now viewed as an obvious way to promote better integration between urban transport modes in cities.

https://blogs.worldbank.org/transport/sustainable-mobility-all-changing-mindset-changing-policies

SUBMITTED BY NANCY VANDYCKE

Successful Teachers, Successful Students: A New Approach Paper on Teachers (World Bank blogs)

Teachers are crucial to the learning process. Every year, we get new evidence from a new country on how much value an effective teacher adds. This is one area where the evidence lines up with intuition: Even without a bunch of value added measures, most of us would readily admit that without good teachers, we wouldn’t be where we are today.

https://blogs.worldbank.org/impactevaluations/successful-teachers-successful-students-new-approach-paper-teachers

SUBMITTED BY DAVID EVANS

CO-AUTHORS: TARA BETEILLE

Policy hackathon explained: How an all-society approach can engage entrepreneurs and governments to develop better policy in West Africa (World Bank blogs)

What would happen if you put all the relevant players for the entrepreneurial ecosystem — startup founders, policymakers, developers, students, investors — into one room and facilitated an open dialogue on improving the business environment? This is exactly what is taking place in West Africa through a series of policy hackathons supported by the World Bank.

https://blogs.worldbank.org/psd/policy-hackathon-explained-how-all-society-approach-can-engage-entrepreneurs-and-governments-develop

SUBMITTED BY ALEXANDRE LAURE

Investing in resource efficiency – the economics and politics of financing the resource transition (World Bank blogs)

“Moving towards a more responsible and efficient use of natural resources is key, not only to address resource scarcity, wastage, and the associated environmental effects, but also for incentivising innovation and modernisation towards a circular economy. Resource efficiency essentially means doing more with less, as it allows us to create more value using fewer natural resources. This transition can contribute to sustainable economic growth that generates welfare, while limiting harmful impacts on the environment and hence future generations.” Ángel Gurría, Secretary General, OECD (from Preface, Flachenecker & Rentschler, 2018)

https://blogs.worldbank.org/climatechange/investing-resource-efficiency-economics-and-politics-financing-resource-transition

SUBMITTED BY JUN ERIK RENTSCHLER

CO-AUTHORS: FLORIAN FLACHENECKER